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If you have an old work-related injury that you are receiving a WCB pension for, and you are continuing to work, the pension you are getting is likely a PFI (permanent functional impairment) pension and it is meant to compensate you for the odd day here and there that you may miss due to the injury. The WCB calls this “normal fluctuations” of the condition. So for example if you have a 5% pension for… 

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Rolf Harrison and Sarah O’Leary will be leading a WCB Advocacy Workshop at the Maritime Labour Centre on November 4th on writing medical-legal opinion requests.  For more information on the course, click here. To register for the course, click here. Rush Crane Guenther regularly offers WCB Advocacy courses for union members on a strictly non-profit basis.  Fees charged are just enough to cover costs (rental of facilities, lunch, and provision of materials).  The courses provide… 

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A lot of injured workers can’t go back to their jobs because of a permanent disability after their injury at work.  They need help to get working again. The WCB (aka WorkSafeBC) can offer different kinds of assistance to do that. The WCB vocational rehabilitation consultant (VRC) has to go through five steps to figure out what kind of help to offer an injured worker: Can the worker return to his/her job with only minor… 

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If you get permanently injured at work you should get one of two kinds of pension from the WCB. Permanent Functional Impairment (PFI) pension: this is intended to compensate for loss of function. For example a physical injury might result in restrictions such as loss of range of motion, loss of strength or loss of sensation, or in symptoms such as chronic pain. The WCB should assess these impairments and pay you a pension based… 

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Across Canada, April 28 has been designated the Day of Mourning; one day set aside to honour those who have been killed by their work. We encourage everyone to give some time today to think about our Brothers and Sisters who have given their lives for their jobs. We at Rush Crane Guenther see the victims of workplace injury and disease every day.  On April 28 we will mourn for the dead but we will… 

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Many of the appeals we do concern back injuries that either: Aren’t accepted as arising from the work accident or work activity; Were accepted for a strain/sprain and the WCB has told the worker that it has resolved, when it has not; or Is diagnosed as a strain/sprain when it is really something more. These situations can be complex and very confusing but it is important to act quickly to deal with them as an… 

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Sarah O’Leary and Rolf Harrison will be presenting a WCB Advocacy Workshop on Pain Diagnoses on May 27, 2016.  See flyer for details!  

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If you believe that, well, good luck to you. We hope you never will. Nobody plans to get hurt at work: to have an accident, stumble while carrying equipment, get exposed to toxic gasses or suffer a psychological trauma that scars you for the rest of your life. But if you do have the misfortune to be hurt on the job or develop an occupational disease, you WILL have to deal with the WCB (aka… 

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Psychological injuries and illness are a leading cause of absences from work in Canada. The most obvious that may come to mind when you think about this is probably post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which is the result of trauma. Most commonly we think of this illness affecting first-responders like firefighters, police, and ambulance paramedics. Certainly these folks pay a heavy price for putting themselves in the way of harm as part of their day-to-day job…. 

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